A new life at 67.Can a woman start all over again?

On the eleventh day of November 1918, at the eleventh hour, the Armistice Treaty that ended the the first World War was signed. They hoped it would be the last. It wasn’t.

Next Sunday we will remember those who took part and died in the wars of the last century,and the soldiers who are still dying today for their country right or wrong today.

The last line of Rudyard Kipling’ s poem Recessional is known by all.

The words of his poem apply more than ever today, the third verse especially.

Rudyard Kipling was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature,exactly a hundred years ago. He lost his only son in WWI.

“Far called our navies melt away.

On dune and headland sinks the fire,

Lo, all our pomp of yesterday

Is one with Nineveh and Tyre.

Judge of the nations, spare us yet,

Lest we forget-lest we forget.

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Comments on: "“Lest we forget” it’s Armistice day again." (4)

  1. This is always a special day for me, having been in the forces, and two of my sons following me, one still in.
    Interestingly, ITV over here did a drama last night, My Boy Jack. It was the story of Kipling’s son’s death, the futility of it, and Rudyard’s reaction to it. A moving tale for a moving day.

  2. Wish I could have seen it.Was surprised at the interest in Armistice Day this year,I suppose Iraq and Afghanistan has brought the meaning of it home again to the generation that weren’t fed on war stories.
    I have a soft spot for the air force.I was attached as a civilian to the USAF in the middle sixties.
    Hope your son is safe.

  3. Lovely post. As the father of a combat veteran, Kipling’s words resonate with me very clearly.

    -smith

  4. Thankyou smith.
    The great poetry that was born of war seems to be at last really appreciated.Could it be that because written under such conditions feelings and then words were captured that without such sorrow and frustration wouldn’t have come to mind.

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